Visitors leave the George Albert Draper mausoleum in Hopedale Village Cemetery - September 8.

Hopedale History
October 1, 2010
No. 165
District Nursing Association

Hopedale in September  

Who’s buried in Draper’s tomb?
Click here to find out.  

Lucy Day –  I’m sure there are a few of you who remember her.

The Hopedale Pond dam
– Milford News article, September 22, 2010

A few weeks ago, Robert Whitman called the Bancroft Library to mention that the 50th anniversary of a tragic event with a Hopedale connection was near. He was referring to the 1960 crash that occurred after a plane that had taken off from Logan Airport hit a flock of birds. Among the 62 passengers killed was Frederick FitzGerald, who was the research director at Draper Corporation. Mr. Whitman, who had moved out of Hopedale in 1960, was certainly right about the 50th coming up soon. It happened on October 4, 1960.
Click here for more.  

Another tragedy was also recalled in the past few days. Tom Ragonese emailed me, asking if I knew anything about Charles Dillon, Jr., who, at the age of six, drowned in Spindleville Pond. With assistance from John and Betty Butcher, I was able to find the Milford News story on it.
Click here for the article and some memories of Charles’s parents.

John Butcher has done quite a search to learn about Charles Johnson, a member of the Massachusetts 54th Infantry, killed in South Carolina in 1863.
Click here to see what he found.

Recent deaths.  

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Milford-Hopedale-Mendon District
                                Nursing Assn. Organized in 1918


                                                         By Helen Symonds


The Milford, Hopedale, Mendon District Nursing Association has become so much a part of this community that it is difficult to visualize the problems which would exist if there were no such organization upon with we could call for assistance.

The beginning of the Association goes back to a group on interested women who realized, after the severe outbreak of influenza in the Milford area in 1918, that thee was a need for supplementing the hospital services that were available and of bringing nursing care directly into the homes.

Under the leadership of the late
Miss Fanny C. Osgood, who became the first president, the Association was formed and by-laws were drawn by the late Judge Lynch.

In addition to Miss Osgood, the other officers first elected were:
Mrs. B.H. Bristow Draper, treasurer, Miss Mildred Nutting, assistant treasurer, and Mrs. F. H. Lally, secretary. Miss Nora Rowel was the first nurse, by the end of the first year 2468 calls were made. By the end of the first year the Association had also opened its headquarters in the Thayer Building where it is still located

In 1920, the school committees of Milford, Mendon and Hopedale engaged one of the Association nurses as part-time school nurse. The School Nursing work has continued through the years to be an important part of the work of the Association, although Milford and Mendon now have their own full-time school nurses.

The first Open Market, which had become an annual custom in Milford, was held October 3, 1924, at the Park Street side of the Mansion House with Mrs. J.J. Duggan as general chairman. It is interesting to note that at about this time a “pencil drive” was held as a means of raising money. The pencils, 10,000 of which were sold, bore the inscription, “District Nursing Association.”

In 1928, due to the increase in work, an office secretary was found to be necessary. During the next decade, home nursing classes were organized, and tuberculosis clinics were held in Mendon, Hopedale and Bellingham. Lectures in child psychology were given in Hopedale and dental clinics were held in Mendon and Bellingham.

During the years health clinics have been an important part of the work of the Association. Regular yearly antigen vaccination clinics were held. In 1956 the clinic work consumed many more hours than ever before, due to the state’s free Salk polio inoculation program. During that year the Association prepared and assisted at 36 clinics in the three towns which it serves

The many ramifications of the District Nursing program could not be carried on without a solid financial backing. Local people have been generous in the past and the association is hopeful that they will assist in making the present 1961 drive successful.
Milford Daily News, May 8, 1961.

                               
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