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    By-laws of the Town of Hopedale - Article V - Concerning Truants - Section 1 - All children between the
    ages of seven and fifteen years, residing in the town, who may be found wandering about in the streets or
    public places of the town, having no lawful occupation or business, not attending school and growing up in
    ignorance, shall be committed to the "Lowell Institution for the reception, instruction, employment and
    reformation of Juvenile Offenders," for confinement, instruction and discipline.” W.H. Jordan, Town Clerk,
    1903

    As soon as conditions make it possible, lunches should be served in the High School every day, and some
    provision made for something warm to accompany the noon lunch brought by elementary grade pupils.
    Carroll H. Drown, Superintendent of Schools, 1924

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                                                        On the Road with Otis

    Today's article comes from a diary of George Otis Draper. I refer to it as a diary, but it's not done in the usual
    fashion of daily entries. Instead it has pages on different topics where he wrote a bit about what he did each
    year. Included are lists of his academic achievements, his work-related memories, the one below on his
    cars, and more. I expect to send more from the diary in the future.

    1899 - In 1899 I tried hard to purchase an automobile ordering a Victor and a Hertel or Oakman and nearly
    connecting with a second hand Locomobile. (For those of you interested in old autos, here's a page on the
    fascinating Hertel.)

    1900 - About June 15, 1900 I received my Mobile and ran it nearly every day for two weeks before sailing for
    Europe. It worked perfectly. In Paris I took four trips, the longest being to Fontainebleau. Returning I found
    my machine out of order due to non-use but it soon got into shape. I took several trips to Boston, best time
    not taking out stops - 1-55, 1-5- Next 1-40. On last trip burnt out boiler by mistake in not turning on water.
    Sold this to (brother) Clare and ordered a Gasmobile at the New York show.


























    When Draper wrote, "About June 15, 1900 I received my Mobile..." he may have been referring to a
    Locomobile like the one above.

    (The Gasmobile, originally called the American, was an automobile first produced in 1899. The name was
    changed to Gasmobile in 1900 by president John H. Flager. It appeared at the New York Auto Show in
    1900. By 1901, 140 cars were made. One of its distinctive features was an automatic starting device. After
    producing a six-cylinder car, the company folded in 1902. Wikipedia)























    1901 - The Gasmobile was a distinct failure. I was stalled by the roadside eleven times with it. I entered the
    country club races and never got there. Once I left it by the roadside in South Milford for two days. At another
    time in Holliston and another in Blackstone. It made me stay overnight in Clinton. It scared horses so one
    threw a baby out and broke its shoulder. I had an expert with me two weeks once and we got one good ride
    out of it. To Boston in 1-30 was the best speed.

    I next got a two seated Milwaukee surrey. I had lots of fun taking the children out but it was slow. I next got a
    Milwaukee single-seater and it has given splendid service. Never stalled once. Went 98 miles one day
    averaging 18 miles an hour a good part of the way.
























    The Milwaukee Automobile Company was founded in 1899 by W.H. Starkweather, Herman Pfiel, and W.G.
    Smith to build cars that were not a “radical departure from all other types” of automobiles… except that they
    were using steam power. Most of the early American steam car manufacturers built cars that looked
    relatively similar but this car, while similar, is fairly different. The first Milwaukee Steam cars appeared in
    1900 and they lasted only through 1902. In 1901, they went to the Chicago Auto Show and exhibited this
    racer – not a body style that many struggling manufacturers would’ve dared to build. ClassicCarWeekly.net

    1902 - Started in with a Toledo Steamer. Did not have power enough. Slow in race, beaten by my first
    Mobile. Did not run it 500 miles in all. Got Winton Touring Car in Sept and had fine success except a hot
    box in the races at Providence and trouble with a weak chain.




























    1903 - New Winton - several thousand miles in all.

    The Winton Motor Car Company developed powerful engines for their vehicles, leading to the construction
    of the first big automobiles. This company was also credited with building the first diesel engine in the U.S.
    in Cleveland. Alexander Winton regarded his factory as the “largest automobile factory in the world,” by
    1900. Winton’s company was the first in the U.S. to attain and continue any sizeable automobile
    production. The Winton Motor Car Company was considered the largest plant producing automobiles,
    exclusively, in the U.S. in 1903. http://www.clevelandstoryteller.com/blog/tag/winton-motor-car/



























    1904 - New Packard - Raced at Readville -won hill climb in Hopedale. Got certificate on St. Louis Run from
    Worcester to Albany. Long tour on Cape. More riding than ever before.
































    1905 - Packard runabout - ran 7000 miles. Raced it at Readville. Also Stanley racer - turned over on  tracks
    at Readville. Also ??? in hill climb at Worcester. Sold it to ?




























    1906 - Packard new runabout also Ford Six Cylinder. In Glidden tour first prize at Crawford Notch Hill Climb.
    Worcester in one hour and five minutes. Sold Stanley Steamer to George Stimpson.





























    1907 - Same cars as last year. Ran Packard up Florida ? in 7 minutes.

    1908 - Same Packard. Sold Ford to Clare. Lots of rides in ? autos while in N.Y. Long Island trips.

                                            
George Otis Draper           Ezine Menu              HOME   


                                                        On the Road with Otis

    Today's article comes from a diary of George Otis Draper. I refer to is as a diary, but it's not done in the usual
    fashion of daily entries. Instead it has pages on different topics where he wrote a bit about what he did each
    year. There are also lists of his academic achievements, his work-related memories, the one below on his
    cars, and more. I expect to send more from the diary in the future.

    1899 - In 1899 I tried hard to purchase an automobile ordering a Victor and a Hertel or Oakman and nearly
    connecting with a second hand Locomobile. (For those of you interested in old autos, here's a page on the
    fascinating Hertel.)

    1900 - About June 15, 1900 I received my Mobile and ran it nearly every day for two weeks before sailing for
    Europe. It worked perfectly. In Paris I took four trips, the longest being to Fontainebleau. Returning I found my
    machine out of order due to non-use but it soon got into shape. I took several trips to Boston, best time not
    taking out stops - 1-55, 1-5- Next 1-40. On last trip burnt out boiler by mistake in not turning on water. Sold
    this to (brother) Clare and ordered a Gasmobile at the New York show.

    The Gasmobile, originally called the American, was an automobile first produced in 1899. The name was
    changed to Gasmobile in 1900 by president John H. Flager. It appeared at the New York Auto Show in 1900.
    By 1901, 140 cars were made. One of its distinctive features was an automatic starting device. After
    producing a six-cylinder car, the company folded in 1902. Wikipedia

    1901 - The Gasmobile was a distinct failure. I was stalled by the roadside eleven times with it. I entered the
    country club races and never got there. Once I left it by the roadside in South Milford for two days. At another
    time in Holliston and another in Blackstone. It made me stay overnight in Clinton. It scared horses so one
    threw a baby out and broke its shoulder. I had an expert with me two weeks once and we got one good ride
    out of it. To Boston in 1-30 was the best speed.

    I next got a two seated Milwaukee surrey. I had lots of fun taking the children out but it was slow. I next got a
    Milwaukee single-seater and it has given splendid service. Never stalled once. Went 98 miles one day
    averaging 18 miles an hour a good part of the way.

    The Milwaukee Automobile Company was founded in 1899 by W.H. Starkweather, Herman Pfiel, and W.G.
    Smith to build cars that were not a “radical departure from all other types” of automobiles… except that they
    were using steam power. Most of the early American steam car manufacturers built cars that looked relatively
    similar but this car, while similar, is fairly different. The first Milwaukee Steam cars appeared in 1900 and they
    lasted only through 1902. In 1901, they went to the Chicago Auto Show and exhibited this racer – not a body
    style that many struggling manufacturers would’ve dared to build. ClassicCarWeekly.net

    1902 - Started in with a Toledo Steamer. Did not have power enough. Slow in race, beaten by my first Mobile.
    Did not run it 500 miles in all. Got Winton Touring Car in Sept and had fine success except a hot box in the
    races at Providence and trouble with a weak chain.

    1903 - New Winton - several thousand miles in all.

    The Winton Motor Car Company developed powerful engines for their vehicles, leading to the construction of
    the first big automobiles. This company was also credited with building the first diesel engine in the U.S. in
    Cleveland. Alexander Winton regarded his factory as the “largest automobile factory in the world,” by 1900.
    Winton’s company was the first in the U.S. to attain and continue any sizeable automobile production. The
    Winton Motor Car Company was considered the largest plant producing automobiles, exclusively, in the U.S.
    in 1903..clevelandstoryteller.com

    1904 - New Packard - Raced at Readville -won hill climb in Hopedale. Got certificate on St. Louis Run from
    Worcester to Albany. Long tour on Cape. More riding than ever before.

    1905 - Packard runabout - ran 7000 miles. Raced it at Readville. Also Stanley racer - turned over on  tracks at
    Readville. Also ??? in hill climb at Worcester. Sold it to ?

    The text below is the same as above. I've added it here in case
    with some browsers, the pictures cover some of the text.