Statistics of Manufacturers - Industrial Chronology - Hopedale, 1892 - 1901.

    Mendon historian Paul Doucette died on January 15. Paul put many pages on Mendon history topics together that are on hope1842.com.
    Here's a link to his obituary and a list of the pages he did.

    Recent additions to existing pages on hope1842.com: Hopedale Buildings Razed in 2016 - 2018 (Rosenfeld stone crusher, Billy
    Draper's Store and 138 Hopedale Street added to page.)    Deaths   

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    Twenty-five years ago - February 1993 - World Trade Center bombing: In New York City, a van bomb parked below the North Tower of
    the World Trade Center explodes, killing six and injuring over 1,000.

    Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms agents raid the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas, with a warrant to arrest leader
    David Koresh on federal firearms violations. Four agents and 5 Davidians die in the raid and a 51-day standoff begins.

    Fifty years ago - February 1968 - A Viet Cong officer named Nguyễn Văn Lém is executed by Nguyễn Ngọc Loan, a South Vietnamese
    National Police Chief. The event is photographed by Eddie Adams. The photo makes headlines around the world, eventually winning the
    1969 Pulitzer Prize, and sways U.S. public opinion against the war.

    The Pennsylvania Railroad and the New York Central Railroad merge to form Penn Central, the largest ever corporate merger up to this
    date

    The 1968 Winter Olympics are held in Grenoble, France.

    A civil rights protest staged at a white-only bowling alley in Orangeburg, South Carolina is broken up by highway patrolmen; 3 college
    students are killed.

    For Hopedale news from 25, 50 and 100 years ago, see below this text box.

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                                                                                   Hopedale in 1918, Part 3

    July 5 - In a recent canvass of the Draper plant for slackers, under the draft, two men, an Armenian and a Portuguese, were found who
    had never registered. They were brought to the District 18 exemption board office and later turned over to the Federal authorities in
    Boston.

    Mrs. Abagail Sayles Heywood, widow of the Rev. William S. Heywood, and daughter of the late Rev. Adin Ballou, died Friday in New
    Rochelle, New York, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Florence Holden. She was born here January 30, 1829, and she and her husband
    conducted the Home School in Hopedale. The body was brought here Saturday for funeral services and burial.

    July 12 - Leon, son of Mr. and Mrs. R.D. Lemon, fell into the pond here Friday while gathering water lilies. He was rescued by a playmate.

    For the week ending July 3, the local branch of the Red Cross turned in the following: 11 pajamas, 13 surgical shirts, 25 pairs of socks,
    6 sweaters, 300 pads with bandages attached.

    The Worcester chapter of the Junior Red Cross reports 300 dozen thread winders, 750 shot bags, 33 crutch pads, and 3 layettes, as the
    work of the pupils at Hopedale schools

    July 19 - Friday Town Clerk Jordan registered one man under the anti-loafing act, and he was at once set to work at the Draper plant.

    A carrier pigeon bearing a brief message was found in the yard of the ,Draper Corporation last Thursday afternoon in an exhausted
    condition. It was cared for and later released.

    July 26 - William Brown is seeking a divorce from his wife on the grounds of desertion.

    Donald Goodnow has entered the officers' training school at Plattsburgh, New York.

    August 2 - Raymond A. Piper has received a commission as second lieutenant.

    The Milford bound electric cars stalled at Patrick's Corner Monday, owing to trouble with the power, and a number of workmen walked to
    Milford rather than wait for the return of the current.

    August 9 - Harold Brown and family are at their summer cottage at Lake Nipmuc for a few days.

    George Albert Draper and daughter, Mrs. W. S. Taft, are enjoying a vacation at Buzzard's Bay.

    During the heated period of the past few days the bath houses of the park system have been filled to capacity.

    An Uxbridge Frenchman, whose name was not obtained, sustained cuts about the head and was rendered unconscious when a rear
    wheel of his loaded lumber wagon collapsed. He was treated by Dr. K.A. Campbell and was later taken home by automobile.

    August 16 - Sgt. Mortimer Dennett has notified relatives of his safe arrival in France.

    Harland H. Hart and family will leave town tomorrow for a week's vacation at Wells Beach, Maine.

    Clifton and Clinton, twin sons of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Tracey, have been in camp this week with the Ashland home guards.

    August 23 - E. L. Tinkham and family went Monday to Hazelton, Penn, for a two week's visit.

    Raymond Gaffney has been at home from Fort Slocum, New York on a brief furlough.

    Mrs. Roy Adams sustained a severe cut on the left hand while canning fruit Tuesday.

    Alba, the ten-year old daughter of Nicola Trotta, is ill with infantile paralysis. While the case is not considered of serious nature, Dr.
    Campbell is in attendance, and a member of the state board of health came here to see that every precaution is taken to prevent the
    spread of the disease.

    No news in binder from September 6.

    September 13 - Exercises appropriate to Lafayette Day were held at the high school Friday. Patriotic selections were sung, and Miss
    Lucy Day gave a sketch of Lafayette's life.

    George Draper, son of Mr. and Mrs. George E. Draper, was on the transport, Mount Vernon, which was torpedoed last Thursday, but his
    name has not appeared on the casualty list and it is believed that the young man is safe. The voyage from France in which the mishap
    occurred would have completed the ninth round trip for the young man.

    September 20 - The Leary brothers have been transferred to a machine gun school at Camp Jackson, South Carolina.

    Mark Woodbine of Worcester, formerly of this town, has reported for service in the aviation corps in New Jersey.

    September 27 - Thomas MacNevin is ill at Camp Devens.

    A number of workmen at the Draper plant are ill with the Spanish influenza.

    The Hopedale band will play at a liberty loan celebration at Worcester this evening.

    The Red Cross headquarters have been closed until next Thursday on account of the epidemic of grippe.

    The Bancroft Library is closed this week on account of the grippe epidemic.

    Fully 400 of the Draper plant employees are out on account of illness.

    The no-school signal was sounded Tuesday on advice of school physician Dr. M. W. Knight. The schools have since remained closed
    on account of the grippe epidemic.

    Almon Draper, a sailor on the steamer Mount Vernon which was recently torpedoed notified his parents that he is alive and well. He was
    one of those who received the commendation of the captain of the Mount Vernon for coolness and rendering valuable assistance at the
    time the ship was attacked.

                                                                                           
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Hopedale News - February 1993

Hopedale News - February 1968

    During the past year, many in this area have read the book, Glad Farm.
    There's the author, Catherine Marenghi on the right.

Hopedale News - February 1918

    The term, "hooverize" came into use when Herbert Hoover became
    head of the United States Food Administration during World War I.