The Post Office

Hopedale Community Postal System             Choosing a postmaster, 1914-15

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Stamps used by the Hopedale Community
for their own postal system.   

    This photo shows the post office when it was in the town hall. Post office workers and Draper employees shown are: (l to r)
    Donald Arey, Elbert Marso, Ralph Holt, Chick Rubeo, Red ?, William Larson, John Connolly and Thomas Eckles.

    In Februrary 2014, I received the following from Bob Marso's daughter.(Elbert Marso, in the photo, was Bob's father.)

    Hi Dan
    My Dad was reflecting on a photo c. 1942.  He believes that some of the printed capture is not quite accurate.  He offers the
    comments below for whatever it's worth

    Concerning the people in the photograph
    Donald Arey - mail carrier, eastern part of town
    Elbert  Marso - Assistant Postmaster (not clerk)
    Ralph Holt - Parcel Post Deliverer and part time mail man
    Chick Rubeo - Draper Corp courier
    (Unknown next man)
    William Lawson - Clerk
    John Connolly - Post Master (not Draper employee see note below)
    Thomas Eckles - mail carrier western part of town

    A few comments on the PO -- Due to shear volume of mail, Chick Rubeo picked up the mail several times a day.  The
    Postmaster job at that time was a political appointee.  It always went to a man from the same political party that held  power at
    the time.  Connolly was an operator of a grocery store that was failing.  His brother in law was Senator David I Walsh, Democrat
    of Mass.  It was he who arranged his appointment.   For the size of the town at the time Hopedale would have been a fourth
    class  post office.  With the Draper Corp. mail it was a first class PO which meant the pay was higher for all involved.

    According to this article, the post office was located in the town hall from the
    time that it was built in 1887, but according to the 1912 Milford Gazette
    article above (under the photo of Susan Thwing Whitney) it evidently didn't
    move into the town hall until then. When it was there, it wasn't in the middle
    of the building where the Spa was, as stated, but on the left as you face it.

    This clipping tells of the house that once
    stood where the post office is now.